The “far right-conservative revolution” will hit the most vulnerable first

Elisa Stowe
Wed 11, 2018, Member-contributed
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Autumn leaves were glowing in the afternoon sun when, on October 12, thousands of protesters took to the streets of Berlin with a clear message: we are indivisible!

We are indivisible when we oppose hatred, xenophobia, misogyny and racism. The “far right-conservative revolution” will not make our lives better. On the contrary, it will tear us apart — hitting the most vulnerable first and worst.

242,000 people united as “Unteilbar” in a broad alliance of political movements, parties and civil society marching from Alexanderplatz to Siegessäule.

The need for indivisibility is clear: from the attempt to criminalize humanitarian work in the Mediterranean — which reached another peak when the mayor of Riace was arrested last month — to the rise of hateful rhetoric like Salvini’s reference to refugees as human flesh, to the elevation of misogynists to the highest levels of judicial power in the United States. Above it all, the urgent threat of climate crisis, which could be felt at the demonstration in Berlin, where temperatures ran way above the average.

Ulteilbar was a sign of hope, reminding us that the political game isn´t over yet. All over, Europe people engaged in similar actions under the umbrella 13-10.

We DiEMers started our day at Volksbühne, where we gathered with our friends and sister movements. For us this was a special moment. Volksbühne was the birthplace of our vision of a democratic Europe back in 2016. As we have seen ever since, our dark predictions came true.

Since DiEMs inception we have learned that we must catalyse a process of alliance-building and seek to be inseparable. We were proud when we united our friends and sister movements behind the DiEM25 banner, and yet we would have carried theirs in the same manner.

We were especially proud when the women from these movements and parties – Razem, Demokratie in Bewegung, European Moment, DiEM25- took over the banner to lead the group for a while. We, the women, chanted and danced together and along the line we talked about strategies and commonalities too.

We all shared moments of joy and friendship that we can carry back into our daily activist practice. The politics of friendship are a mode of resistance.

In this spirit, let’s hope that DiEM25 — and all our societies — shall have a brighter future.

Carpe DiEM

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